Nutrient cycling

The processes by which elements are extracted from their mineral, aquatic, or atmospheric sources or recycled from their organic forms, converting them to the ionic form in which biotic uptake occurs and ultimately returning them to the atmosphere, water, or soil. (MA 2003). the exchange or transformation of elements among the living (organic and biotic) and nonliving (inorganic and abiotic) components (SAFnet, 2008)

Impacts of species diversity on root systems

Trees need root systems for anchorage and for water and nutrient uptake. Root systems consist of stumps, coarse roots and fine roots.  Coarse roots have diameter larger than 2 mm, and fine roots less than 2 mm. Stumps and coarse roots are needed for anchorage and transportation of water and nutrients and their lifespan is long. Fine roots are short living and they take up water and nutrients from soil. In most forests there are in addition to trees also other plants growing in understory. Their roots are mostly fine, less than 2 mm in diameter. The tops of trees can reach the height of...

The understorey, a forest layer with an underestimated importance for ecosystem functioning

The major forest types in Europe, from the Boreal to the Mediterranean region, all include a variable number of native vascular plant species in the understorey layer (1.3 m height), both herbaceous and woody. In spite of its small stature and biomass this layer can contain 90% or more of the plant species of the forest. The functional role of the understory vegetation has already been shown in previous studies on temperate forests. They can serve as: ...
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